science

There’s an interesting article by Phil Bull, “Why you can ignore reviews of scientific code by commercial software developers“. It’s an interesting, generally convincing argument, with a couple of exceptions. (Also worth remembering: What We Can Learn From the Epic Failure of Google Flu Trends.) The first interesting point is the difference between production code…

Read More Code: science and production

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Understanding the way intrusions really happen is a long-standing interest of mine. This is quite a different set of questions compared to “how long does it take to detect,” or “how many records are stolen?” How the intrusion happens is about questions like: Is it phishing emails that steal creds? Email attachments with exploits? SQL…

Read More How Are Computers Compromised (2020 Edition)

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Earlier this year, I helped to organize a workshop at Schloss Dagstuhl on Empirical Evaluation of Secure Development Processes. I think the workshop was a tremendous success, we’ve already seen publications inspired by it, such as Moving Fast and Breaking Things: How to stop crashing more than twice, and I know there’s more forthcoming. I’m…

Read More Empirical Evaluation of Secure Development Processes

The Cybok project has released its v1 “Risk Management & Governance Knowledge Area”; I was a reviewer. Towards Automated Security Design Flaw Detection is an interesting paper from academics in Belgium and Sweden. Steve Lipner offers “Lessons learned through 15 years of SDL at work“ Charles Wilson has perspective on threat modeling devices in “Does…

Read More Interesting Reads: Risk, Automation, lessons and more!

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There was a really interesting paper at the Workshop on the Economics of Information Security. The paper is “Valuing CyberSecurity Research Datasets.” The paper focuses on the value of the IMPACT data sharing platform at DHS, and how the availability of data shapes the research that’s done. On its way to that valuation, a very…

Read More Valuing CyberSecurity Research Datasets

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There’s a fascinating paper, “Tuning Out Security Warnings: A Longitudinal Examination Of Habituation Through Fmri, Eye Tracking, And Field Experiments.” (It came out about a year ago.) The researchers examined what happens in people’s brains when they look at warnings, and they found that: Research in the fields of information systems and human-computer interaction has…

Read More Polymorphic Warnings On My Mind