Software

Recently, I’ve seen four cybersecurity approaches for medical devices, and we can learn by juxtaposing them. The Principles and Practices for Medical Device Cybersecurity is a process-centered and comprehensive document from the International Medical Device Regulators Forum. It covers pre- and post- market considerations, as well as information sharing and coordinated vuln disclosure. It’s important…

Read More Medical Device Security Standards

Back in January, I wrote about “The Dope Cycle and the Two Minutes Hate.” In that post, I talked about: Not kidding: even when you know you’re being manipulated into wanting it, you want it. And you are being manipulated, make no mistake. Site designers are working to make your use of their site as…

Read More The Dope Cycle and a Deep Breath

(Today) Wednesday, May 24th, 2017 at 1:00 PM EDT (17:00:00 UTC), Chris Wysopal and I are doing a SANS webcast, “Choosing the Right Path to Application Security.” I’m looking forward to it, and hope you can join us! Update: the webcast is now archived, and the white paper associated with it, “Using Cloud Deployment to…

Read More Adam & Chris Wysopal webcast

Nothing. No, seriously. Articles like “Microsoft Secure Boot key debacle causes security panic” and “Bungling Microsoft singlehandedly proves that golden backdoor keys are a terrible idea” draw on words in an advisory to say that this is all about golden keys and secure boot. This post is not intended to attack anyone; researchers, journalists or…

Read More What does the MS Secure Boot Issue teach us about key escrow?

John Masserini has a set of “open letters to security vendors” on Security Current. Everyone involved in product or sales at a security startup should read them. John provides insight into what it’s like to be pitched by too many startups, and provides a level of transparency that’s sadly hard to find. Personally, I learned…

Read More Open Letters to Security Vendors

One of the most interesting security books I’ve read in a while barely mentions computers or security. The book is Petroski’s The Evolution of Useful Things. As the subtitle explains, the book discusses “How Everyday Artifacts – From Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers – Came to be as They are.” The chapter…

Read More The Evolution of Secure Things

[There are broader critiques by Katie Moussouris of HackerOne at “Legally Blind and Deaf – How Computer Crime Laws Silence Helpful Hackers” and Halvar Flake at “Why changes to Wassenaar make oppression and surveillance easier, not harder.” This post addresses the free speech issue.] During the first crypto wars, cryptography was regulated under the US…

Read More Wassenaar Restrictions on Speech

Photographers should check out Flash applets on some technical aspects of photography at Stanford. The apps help you understand things like “Variables that Affect Exposure” (the aperture/time/ISO tradeoffs) as well as how lenses work, create depth of field, or how a telephoto lens bends the light. Very cool.

Read More Cool Optics Flash Applets