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Congratulations to the Hayabusa2 mission team, who flew to an asteroid, dropped multiple rovers, an impactor and a separate camera satellite to observe the impactor. The Hayabusa2 then flew around, to the far side of the asteroid to avoid ejecta from the impactor. In a few weeks, Hayabusa2 will probably land, collect more samples and…

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Space Elevator Test

So cool! STARS-Me (or Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite – Mini elevator), built by engineers at Shizuoka University in Japan, is comprised of two 10-centimeter cubic satellites connected by a 10-meter-long tether. A small robot representing an elevator car, about 3 centimeters across and 6 centimeters tall, will move up and down the cable using…

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I had not seen this amazing picture of Harrison Schmitt near Shorty Crater. Via Astronomy Picture of the Day. If you enjoy these, Full Moon is a gorgeous collection of meticulously scanned Apollo images. There are various editions; I encourage you to get the 11″x11″ one, not the 8×8.

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This image isn’t Saturn’s Rings, but an image of Saturn from its pole to equator. Sadly, many of the sites reporting on Cassini’s dive through Saturn’s rings — I’m going to say that again — Cassini’s first dive through Saturn’s rings — don’t explain the photos. I’ll admit it, I thought I was looking at…

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Today’s “the future is cool” entry is the cliffs of insanity: Actually, I’m lying to you, they’re the Cliffs of Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko, as photographed by the Rosetta spacecraft. I just think its cool similar they look, and how the physical processes which created the Cliffs of Moher may also have been at work on a…

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