science

From his very first experiments, he could see that these animals were unrelated to jellyfish. In fact, they were profoundly different from any other animal on Earth.

Moroz reached this conclusion by testing the nerve cells of ctenophores for the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and nitric oxide, chemical messengers considered the universal neural language of all animals. But try as he might, he could not find these molecules. The implications were profound.

Read “Aliens in our midst” at Aeon.

A study found that those who cycle have a net 41% lower risk of premature death. Now, when I read that headline my first thought was that it was 100 people over 6 months and a statistical fluke. But no, they followed a quarter million Britons for 5 years. Now, it’s not obvious that it’s…

Read More Bicycling and Risk

There’s a new paper from Mark Thompson and Hassan Takabi of the University of North Texas. The title captures the question: Effectiveness Of Using Card Games To Teach Threat Modeling For Secure Web Application Developments Gamification of classroom assignments and online tools has grown significantly in recent years. There have been a number of card…

Read More Do Games Teach Security?

“Better safe than sorry” are the closing words in a NYT story, “A Colorado Town Tests Positive for Marijuana (in Its Water).” Now, I’m in favor of safety, and there’s a tradeoff being made. Shutting down a well reduces safety by limiting the supply of water, and in this case, they closed a pool, which…

Read More "Better Safe than Sorry!"

There’s a great “long read” at CIO, “6 Software Development Lessons From Healthcare.gov’s Failed Launch.” It opens: This article tries to go further than the typical coverage of Healthcare.gov. The amazing thing about this story isn’t the failure. That was fairly obvious. No, the strange thing is the manner in which often conflicting information is…

Read More Security Lessons from Healthcare.gov