science

I’m excited to be a part of the ACM’s 2005 Computer and Communication Security Conference, which has an Industry Track this year. We’re working to foster more interplay and collaboration between industry, the public sector, and academia: The track aims to foster tighter interplay between the demands of real-world security systems and the efforts of…

Read More CCS Industry Track

Cory Doctrow points to a letter he’s sent American Airlines about The security officer then handed me a blank piece of paper and said, “Please write down the names and addresses of everyone you’re staying with in the USA.” and his Kafka-esque experience in trying to find out why they were asking. Good on Cory…

Read More Small Bits: Secret Law and Security, Root-Fu, New Blog, and Canadians Stagnate

In a comment yesterday, Chris Walsh said: In any case, this should not be a difficult nut to crack, in principle. The US government conducts surveys of businesses all the time, and is capable of obtaining quality samples and high response rates in which academics justly have confidence. In theory, I agree with Chris. In…

Read More Trouble with Surveying Cybercrime

In responding to my comments about Truro’s DNA dragnet, with a fascinating discussion of signaling, Eric Rescorla writes: Even if they’re not the perp, they may have other reasons not to have their DNA collected–for instance they’ve committed another crime that their DNA might match to. (The police say they’re only going to use the…

Read More DNA Dragnets and Criminal Signaling

The study, published in the January issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, concluded that the estimated $7.55 million spent on [SARS] screening at several Canadian airports failed to detect one case of the disease. … “Sometimes what seems like a reasonable thing to do doesn’t turn out that way,” the report’s lead author, Dr.…

Read More Evaluating Security