Google Reader Going Away

Remarkably, some software that people host on your behalf, where you have no contract or just a contract of adhesion, can change at any time.

This isn’t surprising to those who study economics, as all good New School readers try to do. However, this is a reminder/request that when you move, please resubscribe to New School. We have some interesting announcements forthcoming, and will try to get more interesting content up soon.

Please vote New School

We’re honored to be nominated in three categories for the Security Bloggers Awards:

  • Most Educational
  • Most Entertaining
  • Hall of Fame

On behalf of all of us who blog here, we’re honored by the nomination, and would like to ask for your vote.

We’d also like to urge you to vote for our friends at Securosis for “Best Representing the Security Industry.” We don’t think Securosis actually is the best representative of the industry today. But I think they represent what we all ought to aspire to be, a empirical, business-aware industry. So please consider them as a part of the broad “New School” sort of slate. We’d also like to put a word in for the ThreatPost podcast as a great mix of technical and non-technical content, and for Veracode for best corporate blog. We’re suggesting Veracode in large part for Chris Eng’s empirical and side-splittingly funny thought leadership videos, but also for a general avoidance of FUD in their blogging.

But whomever you like, please take a moment to vote.

The New School of Software Engineering?

This is a great video about how much of software engineering runs on folk knowledge about how software is built:

Greg Wilson – What We Actually Know About Software Development, and Why We Believe It’s True

There’s a very strong New School tie here. We need to study what’s being done and how well it works to figure out how to make better software more reliably.

Incidentally, at around 28 minutes in, Wilson mentions Nachi Nagappan‘s work on physical distance versus managerial distance, and then jumps to remote hires at a a startup. While I’m not sure of which paper Wilson is discussing, almost all of Nagappan’s work is done with Microsoft developers and products. As such, both have to be seen in the context of Microsoft’s deep and shared experience in shipping software. By definition, that shared experience doesn’t exist at a startup. And as to the managerial distance issue, it’s satirically discussed here. Assuming that his results generalize is a large jump, and one that I’m not sure I’d make.