background checks

The New York Times reports that “As a Hiring Filter, Credit Checks Draw Questions:” In defending employers’ use of credit checks as part of the hiring process, Eric Rosenberg of the TransUnion credit bureau paints a sobering picture. […] Screening the backgrounds of employees “is critical to protect the safety of Connecticut residents in their…

Read More Credit Checks are a Best Practice in Hiring

In “Social networking: Your key to easy credit?,” Eric Sandberg writes: In their quest to identify creditworthy customers, some are tapping into the information you and your friends reveal in the virtual stratosphere. Before calling the privacy police, though, understand how it’s really being used. … To be clear, creditors aren’t accessing the credit reports…

Read More Your credit worthiness in 140 Characters or Less

As I simmer with anger over how TSA is subpoening bloggers, it occurs to me that the state of airline security is very similar to that of information security in some important ways: Failures are rare Partial failures are generally secret Actual failures are analyzed in secret Procedures are secret Procedures seem bizarre and arbitrary…

Read More The New School of Air Travel Security?

According to the Wall St Journal, “Iranian Crackdown Goes Global ,” Iran is monitoring Facebook, and in a move reminiscent of the Soviets, arresting people whose relatives criticize the regime online. That trend is part of a disturbing tendency to criminalize thoughts, intents, and violations of social norms, those things which are bad because they…

Read More Fingerprinted and Facebooked at the Border

South African runner Caster Semenya won the womens 800-meter, and the attention raised questions about her gender. Most of us tend to think of gender as pretty simple. You’re male or you’re female, and that’s all there is to it. The issue is black and white, if you’ll excuse the irony. There are reports that:…

Read More Caster Semenya, Alan Turing and "ID Management" products

The New York Times reports: At least six men suspected or convicted of crimes that threaten national security retained their federal aviation licenses, despite antiterrorism laws written after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, that required license revocation. Among them was a Libyan sentenced to 27 years in prison by a Scottish court for the…

Read More The Cost of Anything is the Foregone Alternative