Adam’s Mailing List and Commitment Devices

Yesterday, I announced that I’ve set up a mailing list. You may have noticed an unusual feature to the announcement: a public commitment to it being low volume, with a defined penalty ($1,000 to charity) for each time I break the rule.

You might even be wondering why I did that.

In the New School, we study people, and their motivations. Knowing that introspection is a fine place to start, a poor place to end and an excellent source of mis-direction, I talked to several people who seem like the sort I want on my list about their experience with mail lists.

The first thing I heard was fairly unanimous: people don’t subscribe because they get spammed.
The perception is that many people who create lists like this abuse those lists. So to address that, I’m using a commitment device: a promise, made publicly in advance. By making that promise, I give myself a reason to hold back from over-mailing, and I give myself a way to constrain helping others with my list. (But not eliminate such help — perhaps that’s a bad idea, and it should be just about those new things where I’m a creator. Would love your thoughts.)

The second issue I heard is that unsubscribing tends to feel like an interpersonal statement, rather than a technical one (such as “I get too much email.) So I promise not to be offended if you unsubscribe, and I promise to be grateful if you tell me why you unsubscribe. This is why I love Twitter: I control who I listen to. It’s also why I think the “unfollow unsubscribe bug” (real or imagined) was such a good thing. It provided a socially acceptable excuse for unfollows.

Are there other factors that hold you back from signing up for a mailing list like mine? Please let me know what they are, I’d love to address them if I can.

Getting Ready for a Launch

I’m getting ready for to announce a new project that I’ve been working on for quite a while.

As I get ready, I was talking to friends in PR and marketing, and they were shocked and appalled that I don’t have a mailing list. It was a little like telling people in security that you don’t fuzz your code.

Now, I don’t know a lot about marketing, but I do know that look which implies table stakes. So I’ve set up a mailing list. I’ve cleverly named it “Adam Shostack’s New Thing.” It’ll be the first place to hear about the new things I’m creating — books, games or anything else.

People who sign up will be the first to hear my news.

[Update: Some people are asking why I don’t just use Twitter or blogs? I plan to, but there are people who’d like more concentrated news in their inbox. Cool. I can help them. And much as I love Twitter, it’s easy for a tweet to be lost, and easy to fall into the trap of retweeting yourself every hour to overcome that. That’s annoying to your followers who see you repeating yourself.]

Please vote for the social security blogger awards!

Alan Shimmy has the nominations for the 2014 Social Security bloggers award!

New School has been nominated for most entertaining, while Emergent Chaos has been nominated for best representing the security industry and the hall of fame.

Now, I have no idea what it means that Emergent Chaos would represent the security industry. I’m hopeful that it’s intended as a complement.

The Worst User Experience In Computer Security?

I’d like to nominate Xfinity’s “walled garden” for the worst user experience in computer security.

For those not familiar, Xfinity has a “feature” called “Constant Guard” in which they monitor your internet for (I believe) DNS and IP connections for known botnet command and control services. When they think you have a bot, you see warnings, which are inserted into your web browsing via a MITM attack.

Recently, I was visiting family, and there was, shock of all shocks, an infected machine. So I pulled out my handy-dandy FixMeStick*, and let it do its thing. It found and removed a pile of cruft. And then I went to browse the web, and still saw the warnings that the computer was infected. This is the very definition of a wicked environment, one in which feedback makes it hard to understand what’s happening. (A concept that Jay Jacobs has explicitly tied to infosec.)

So I manually removed Java, and spent time reading the long list of programs that start at boot (via Autoruns, which Xfinity links to if you can find the link), re-installed Firefox, and did a stack of other cleaning work. (Friends at browser makers: it would be nice if there was a way to forcibly remove plugins, rather than just disable them).

As someone who’s spent a great deal of time understanding malware propagation methods, I was unable to decide if my work was effective. I was unable to determine the state of the machine, because I was getting contradictory signals.

My family (including someone who’d been a professional Windows systems administrator) had spent a lot of time trying to clean that machine and get it out of the walled garden. The tools Xfinity provided did not work. They did not clean the malware from the system. Worse, the feedback Xfinity themselves provided was unclear and ambiguous (in particular, the malware in question was never named, nor was the date of the last observation available). There was no way to ask for a new scan of the machine. That may make some narrow technical sense, given the nature of how they’re doing detection, but that does not matter. The issue here is that a person of normal skill cannot follow their advice and clean the machine. Even a person with some skill may be unable to see if their work is effective. (I spent a good hour reading through what runs at startup via Autoruns).

I understand the goals of these walled garden programs. But the folks running them need to invest in talking to the people in the gardens, and understand why they’re not getting out. There’s good reasons for those failures, and we need to study the failures and address those reasons.

Until then, I’m interested in hearing if there’s a worse user experience in computer security than being told your recently cleaned machine is still dirty.

* Disclaimer: FixMeStick was founded by friends who I met at Zero-Knowledge Systems, and I think that they refunded my order. So I may be biased.

Transparency: When Security Pros Get Popped

Rich Mogul over at Securosis (N.B. I’m a contributing analyst there) has a great post on how, due to human error, some of his AWS credentials got nabbed by some miscreants and abused. We here at the New School love it when folks share how they were compromised and what they did about it. It is this sort of transparency that helps us all. Kudos to Rich for being willing to share his pain for our benefit.

What's Copyright, Doc?

I blogged yesterday about all the new works that have entered the public domain as their copyright expired in the United States. If you missed it, that’s because exactly nothing entered the public domain yesterday.

Read more — but only commentary, because there’s no newly free work — at “What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2014?

It’s near-impossible to see how our insanely long copyright terms, or their never-ending extensions encourage Dr. Seuss, Ayn Rand, Jack Kerouac or Ian Fleming to keep producing new work. Those authors have been richly rewarded for their work. But it’s easy to see how keeping those works under copyright reduces creative re-use of our collective cultural heritage.