More on Real Name Policies

There were a couple of excellent posts about Google+ which I wanted to link in, but the post took a different path:

  • Google+ and The Trouble With Tribbles

    The trouble with social is that it is social – with all the norms, behaviors and expectations that come with that. You cannot re-engineer that overnight (Facebook is being far more successful in doing so using far more insidious means). Facebook also has a policy of Real Names, but it realizes that to make the social work you have to cater to the psychology of the users. So there are no identity verification processes, no automatic suspension of accounts and schemes that entice us to provide real data instead of telling us to do so. The fidelity of the data is proven by it’s socially verified reputation, not because there is a policy document that can be pointed to (at the end of the day, a much more robust and legitimate mechanism).

  • For Ceorl Onlyone, thanks…

    “As I’ve said previously, I left Facebook and Google+ because I could see the direction and I discerned the narrowing that indicates both subtle and direct attacks upon choice and privacy. I left because my presence was a reason for my family, friends, and peers to remain.

  • The Social Graph is Neither.”
    There’s no clear pull quote, but boy is this a great de-construction of the phrase (and product name) “the social graph”. Read it carefully, and you’ll never hear those words the same way.

  • In a number of places, including “Take back the comments: stop online harassment” and comment on “Why it Matters: Google+ and Diversity, part 2,” Kathy Sierra says:

    Keep the pseudonyms and lose the assholes.

Previously: “Google+ Failed Because of Real Names” and “Yes, Google+ Is a Failure