June 2008

Two days ago, Marc Weber Tobias pointed out that Medeco, the 800 pound gorilla in the high-security lock market, recently published an open letter to the locksport community, welcoming it to the physical security industry: While we have worked with many locksmiths and security specialists in the past to improve our cylinders, this is the…

Read More Medeco Embraces The Locksport Community

The TSA apparently is issuing itself badges in its continuing search for authority. The attire aims to convey an image of authority to passengers, who have harassed, pushed and in a few instances punched screeners. “Some of our officers aren’t respected,” TSA spokeswoman Ellen Howe said. … A.J. Castilla, a screener at Boston’s Logan Airport…

Read More R-E-S-E-P-C-T! Find out what it means to me

In “The Pros and Cons of LifeLock,” Bruce Schneier writes: In reality, forcing lenders to verify identity before issuing credit is exactly the sort of thing we need to do to fight identity theft. Basically, there are two ways to deal with identity theft: Make personal information harder to steal, and make stolen personal information…

Read More Identity Theft is more than Fraud By Impersonation

Kim Zetter on Threat Level has written about Larry Lessig’s comments about Judge Alex Kozinski’s problems with having files on a personal server made public. Zetter has asked to hear people’s opinions about the issue. I thought I’d just blog about mine. Basically, I agree with Lessig. The major place that I disagree with Lessig…

Read More L'affaire Kozinski

One of the curious features of Quantum Cryptographers is the way they harumph at mathematics. “Don’t trust that math stuff, you should trust physics.” It’s easy to sneer at this attitude because physics has traditionally gotten its cred because of its foundations in math. Physicists are just mathematicians who don’t squick at canceling dxes. Quantum…

Read More Quantum Pride

Debix, Verizon, the ID Theft Research Center and the Department of Justice have all released really interesting reports in the last few days, and what makes them interesting is their data about what’s going wrong in security. This is new. We don’t have equivalents of the National Crime Victimization Surveys for cyberspace. We don’t have…

Read More Can You Hear Me Now?

There’s an important new report out from the Department of Justice, “Data Breaches: What the Underground World of “Carding” Reveals.” It’s an analysis of several cases and the trends in carding and the markets which exist. I want to focus in on one area, which is recommendations around breach notification: Several bills now before Congress…

Read More Department of Justice on breach notice