2006

In March of 2005, Alec Muffett predicted “National loyalty cards,” and I mocked him for it. Since then, I’ve decided that all non-trivial privacy fears come true. And since then, Alec’s plan has taken another step. The BBC reports about a new “Blair plan for ‘people’s panels’.” No, I didn’t make that up, Comrade. He…

Read More All Privacy Invasion Fears Come True: Thanks, Alec

Saar Drimer and Steven Murdoch will be getting lumps of coal from the banking industry, and amused laughter from the rest of us: It is important to remember, however, that even perfect tamper resistance only ensures that the terminal will no longer be able to communicate with the bank once opened. It does not prevent…

Read More Chip, Pin and Tetris

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Privacy Office conducted a review of the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) collection and use of commercial data during initial testing for the Secure Flight program that occurred in the fall 2004 through spring 2005. The Privacy Office review was undertaken following notice by the TSA Privacy Officer of preliminary…

Read More DHS says one thing, does another. Film at 11.

In “Radical Transparency to improve resilience,” John Robb posts about Chris Anderson’s ‘radical transparency:’ Think about how these tactics can be applied to societal resilience: Show who we are. Show what we are working on. “Process as Content.” Privilege the crowd. Let readers decide what is best (aka: wisdom of the crowd) Wikify (this another…

Read More Radical Transparency and Society

There’s an article in Wall Street and Technology, “When Risk Managers Cry Wolf.” It opens: Avoiding “reputation risk” is a common justification for increasing security measures, protecting customers’ financial information and reporting security breaches in a timely manner. But now more than 18 months after the big ChoicePoint incident when 163,000 bogus accounts were created…

Read More That wasn't so bad after all…