2005

Scientists have discovered the “beautifully preserved” bones of about 20 dodos at a dig site in Mauritius. Little is known about the dodo, a famous flightless bird thought to have become extinct in the 17th century. No complete skeleton has ever been found in Mauritius, and the last full set of bones was destroyed in…

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In search of a terrorist nuclear bomb, the federal government since 9/11 has run a far-reaching, top secret program to monitor radiation levels at over a hundred Muslim sites in the Washington, D.C., area, including mosques, homes, businesses, and warehouses, plus similar sites in at least five other cities, U.S. News has learned. In numerous…

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This week’s Friday Star Wars Security Blogging closes the design principles series. (More on that in the first post of the series, “Economy of Mechanism.”) We close with the principle of psychological acceptability. We do so through the story that ties the six movies together: The fall and redemption of Anakin Skywalker. There are four…

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The question is a fair and natural one to ask, and I’d like to examine it in depth. I think my intuitive answer (“revelations about wiretaps don’t help the terrorists”) is wrong, and that there are surprising effects of revealing investigative measures. Further, those are effects I haven’t seen discussed. Allow me to explain the…

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Among those who understand that software is, almost without exception, full of security holes, there are at least three major orientations. I’ve recently seen three articles, all of which I wanted to talk about, but before I do I should explain how I’m using the word orientation, and the connotations it carries. As used by…

Read More Epstein, Snow and Flake: Three Views of Software Security